Automatic Duck Xsend Motion is a bridge between Final Cut Pro X and Motion

Automatic Duck Xsend Motion is a bridge between Final Cut Pro X and Motion

What is Xsend Motion?

I’ve always been a big fan of the Automatic Duck tools and they’ve been known to have one of the coolest logos in the industry. But more importantly, their tools have always helped get your projects from one host to another, like a bridge between two cliffs. The Automatic Duck tools have been workflow godsends for so many people in the industry. Xsend Motion creates a bridge between Final Cut Pro X and Motion, and if you’re a power user, this is very obvious to you that this was missing! Wes Plate of Automatic Duck is back with a new product that translates those Transform parameters, titles, blend modes and more, from FCP X to Motion.

Here’s a little video to give you an idea how it works.

Xsend Motion Reviews

There have been a few reviews out in the past week since it was released and they have been very positive. Don’t believe me? Here it is from some others.

Buy Xsend Motion from Automatic Duck

You can download a demo and try Automatic Duck’s Xsend Motion for yourself. There are a couple of things you need to know.

  1. It’s Mac only, but that should be no problem since FCPX and Motion are also Mac only.
  2. It requires Noise Industries FxFactory to run (free download).

Buy Xsend Motion

You can save 5% every day at Toolfarm on Xsend Motion (and all FxFactory plug-ins for that matter). Get it here and learn a whole lot more about Xsend Motion.

Creating Stunning Cinemagraphs from the ISS with Final Cut Pro X and Flixel

“Armand Dijcks very kindly describes how he made the stunning cinemagraphs from images taken by Dutch astronaut André Kuipers on the International Space Station. Final Cut Pro X’s optical flow was the tool to smooth the large resolution timelapses.

We have always been a fan of making cinemagraphs and when we saw these gorgeous ones shot form the ISS, we had to find out more.

Armand takes up the story:

 

I’ve recently been working on a series of 4K cinemagraphs that are, quite literally, out of this world. They were created from images captured by the crew of the International Space Station.

In recent years I’ve been fortunate to be able to do some work for Dutch astronaut André Kuipers, who visited the ISS twice. During his second mission, he and his crew mates captured almost half a million images of planet Earth.

Having worked with this vast image library to create time lapse segments, I thought they would provide a really great subject for cinemagraphs as well. In contrast to a time lapse film, a cinemagraph allows you to take in the view and gaze at it for as long as you like.

To make this happen, I had to overcome a few challenges, but we’ll get to that later. First, let me take you on a virtual trip to the space station and have a look at how these amazing images are captured.” – FCP.CO

Click Here to Learn More at FCP.CO

 

FCPX Workflow: One Smart Collection To Rule Them All

“The first key to workflow wizardry is to exploit an application’s strengths. In exploring the nuances of FCPX, famed workflow wizard Simon Ubsdell opens up some of the secrets around one of its most uniquely powerful, but sorely underused tools: Smart Collections. This isn’t about replacing your existing project management (although it can). It’s about leveraging some of the ridiculously awesome power of the Smart Collection to make your work flow far more easily than you might have imagined.

Another aspect of Simon’s wizardry: this is something he quickly whipped together springing out of two very energetic conversations in Creative COW’s FCPX or Not: The Debate forum. The first is based on Charlie Austin’s presentation for FCPWORKS’ FCP Exchange, called Making the Switch to X: A Comparative Study. As the conversation evolved, Simon more deeply explored the specific question, what might happen if you used one Library, one Event, one Smart Collection to organize everything? He continued to explore this on the new thread from whence this tutorial emerges, One Smart Collection to Rule Them All’>One Smart Collection to Rule Them All.

Take a look at this, then take a look at those, and prepare for your workflow to be transformed. Not unlike magic.” – Simon Ubsdell | Creative Cow

Click Here to Learn More

Slow Down the Action With Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X

“It’s easy to slow down time using Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. Master the technique with FREE stock footage and music from Shutterstock and PremiumBeat.

One of our favorite video editing tools is Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. This feature, similar to the popular Twixtor plugin, allows users to slow down clips in a way that simulates footage shot at a high frame rate.

Optical Flow is a great creative tool for showcasing your film and video projects in a unique way. The following video tutorial will demonstrate how to use creatively use Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X.

But don’t just watch the clip… fire up Final Cut Pro X and discover what it’s like to manipulate time with Optical Flow! We’ve teamed up with Shutterstock to give you free assets so you can follow along.” – PremiumBeat

Click Here to Learn More

The Top Ten Tips for Good Looking Typography in Final Cut Pro X

“Yes, the 3D text in Final Cut Pro X is amazing, but it is not a one-click solution to getting good looking text. We take a look at ten tips that should help to make your words on screen look good and avoid some common mistakes.

 

There is no doubt that good typography is hard. That’s why there are graphic designers who do nothing but concentrate on the design and layout of text.

The days of molten metal and Linotype machines are long gone, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t apply some old basic rules and guides to laying out text, this time in an NLE.

So here’s my top ten tips for making good looking, readable text in Final Cut Pro X. The examples are shown with the FCPX GUI, but the most of the techniques apply to all editing systems with a character generator.

10) Kerning

My pet hate is bad kerning and yes I shout at the television when I see text with incorrect spacing. It is also one of those things where once you have been made aware of it, you will see it everywhere.

Kerning is the adjustment of spacing between individual characters – not to be confused with tracking which adjusts the spacing between all characters at the same time.

Well kerned text should have the same surface area between each pair of letters or indeed numbers. Some fonts auto-kern, but still need a tweak to get looking right.

Take the name David for example as this is quite common in credits and shows the problem up well. The top name in the example below shows the text uncorrected. The second David highlights the different spacing between characters.

The third, kerned David shows an easier to read version where the character positions have been adjusted correctly. You can see there has been a lot of movement between the A and V, with not as much between the V and I.

FCPX kerning

Don’t forget that good kerning rules should also be applied to numbers.

FCPX kerning numbers

You will find the kerning control in the text inspector, but you’ll have to twiddle down the Advanced disclosure triangle to see it. Place the cursor in-between the letters and kern away until it looks good. Move on to the next spacing and repeat.

FCPX kerning GUI

9) Serif or not Serif?

Hang on a minute, what on earth is a serif?

A serif is a small extra line attached to a letter, indicated below by the red arrows on the image. They originated from the days when text was written with a brush. By varying the pressure and angle of the brush, these additions or flourishes to each character were added.

Serif fonts include Times, Courier and Copperplate which you should all find on a standard install of FCPX & OS X.

Fonts without serifs are called sans-serif and include the Helveticas, Arials and Lucida Grande for example.

With the current design trend for flat graphics, the contemporary thought for good design is to use san-serif fonts. Personally I think they are easier to read anyway and are my choice unless I’m looking for the old typography look of a book or newspaper.” – Peter Wiggins

Click Here to View the Rest

CoreMelt LUTx

Color Look Up Tables (LUTs) allow you to apply preset color grades by professional colorists easily on your own footage. CoreMelt LUTx is the most powerful LUT solution for Final Cut Pro X. Plus, get LUTx for free when you purchase the CoreMelt Everything Bundle.

The initial release comes with 40 Feature Film looks designed by feature film colorist Shane Bartley in our first LUT collection, with more coming soon. Unique features include the ability to create subtle looks by lowering the intensity of the LUT in shadows, midtones and highlights, custom intuitive sliders, realtime previews of LUTs in our LUT browser and realtime wipe preview.

Click Here to Learn More & Purchase

Masterclass || John de Borman – Composition & Framing

“John de Borman takes us through his method of composition and framing in films. Deconstructing the meaning behind the characters, scene or location and how to portray these elements in a concise and methodical way. We use examples from ‘An Education’, ‘Made in Dagenham’, ‘If I stay’, ‘Quartet’ and ‘The Full Monty’.” – Cooke Optics

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the Cooke Optics youtube channel you are missing out! You can be sure that its going to be one of the hottest new channels in the film industry!

Click Here to Learn More

View Products for Final Cut Pro

Customize Default Effects in Final Cut Pro X

“Apple’s recent Final Cut Pro X update includes a convenient new feature that allows users to easily assign default audio and video effects to their clips using a simple keyboard shortcut. Let’s take a look at how it works.

With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, Apple is certainly not attempting to reinvent the wheel. For the most part, the update includes bug fixes, performance enhancements, and other new features, such as the ability to output to multiple YouTube clips at once. But one of the more interesting additions to 10.2.3, one that will make certain editorial tasks easier and more convenient, is Final Cut Pro X’s ability to customize default effects.

Many of you are probably already familiar with Final Cut Pro X’s default transitions as a result of using the shortcutCMD+T. With a clip selected, this will automatically apply a cross dissolve, giving editors a very fluid method for applying a transition without using their mouse.” – Noam Kroll | PremiumBeat

Click Here to View the Full Tutorial