FCPX Workflow: One Smart Collection To Rule Them All

“The first key to workflow wizardry is to exploit an application’s strengths. In exploring the nuances of FCPX, famed workflow wizard Simon Ubsdell opens up some of the secrets around one of its most uniquely powerful, but sorely underused tools: Smart Collections. This isn’t about replacing your existing project management (although it can). It’s about leveraging some of the ridiculously awesome power of the Smart Collection to make your work flow far more easily than you might have imagined.

Another aspect of Simon’s wizardry: this is something he quickly whipped together springing out of two very energetic conversations in Creative COW’s FCPX or Not: The Debate forum. The first is based on Charlie Austin’s presentation for FCPWORKS’ FCP Exchange, called Making the Switch to X: A Comparative Study. As the conversation evolved, Simon more deeply explored the specific question, what might happen if you used one Library, one Event, one Smart Collection to organize everything? He continued to explore this on the new thread from whence this tutorial emerges, One Smart Collection to Rule Them All’>One Smart Collection to Rule Them All.

Take a look at this, then take a look at those, and prepare for your workflow to be transformed. Not unlike magic.” – Simon Ubsdell | Creative Cow

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Slow Down the Action With Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X

“It’s easy to slow down time using Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. Master the technique with FREE stock footage and music from Shutterstock and PremiumBeat.

One of our favorite video editing tools is Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. This feature, similar to the popular Twixtor plugin, allows users to slow down clips in a way that simulates footage shot at a high frame rate.

Optical Flow is a great creative tool for showcasing your film and video projects in a unique way. The following video tutorial will demonstrate how to use creatively use Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X.

But don’t just watch the clip… fire up Final Cut Pro X and discover what it’s like to manipulate time with Optical Flow! We’ve teamed up with Shutterstock to give you free assets so you can follow along.” – PremiumBeat

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The Top Ten Tips for Good Looking Typography in Final Cut Pro X

“Yes, the 3D text in Final Cut Pro X is amazing, but it is not a one-click solution to getting good looking text. We take a look at ten tips that should help to make your words on screen look good and avoid some common mistakes.

 

There is no doubt that good typography is hard. That’s why there are graphic designers who do nothing but concentrate on the design and layout of text.

The days of molten metal and Linotype machines are long gone, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t apply some old basic rules and guides to laying out text, this time in an NLE.

So here’s my top ten tips for making good looking, readable text in Final Cut Pro X. The examples are shown with the FCPX GUI, but the most of the techniques apply to all editing systems with a character generator.

10) Kerning

My pet hate is bad kerning and yes I shout at the television when I see text with incorrect spacing. It is also one of those things where once you have been made aware of it, you will see it everywhere.

Kerning is the adjustment of spacing between individual characters – not to be confused with tracking which adjusts the spacing between all characters at the same time.

Well kerned text should have the same surface area between each pair of letters or indeed numbers. Some fonts auto-kern, but still need a tweak to get looking right.

Take the name David for example as this is quite common in credits and shows the problem up well. The top name in the example below shows the text uncorrected. The second David highlights the different spacing between characters.

The third, kerned David shows an easier to read version where the character positions have been adjusted correctly. You can see there has been a lot of movement between the A and V, with not as much between the V and I.

FCPX kerning

Don’t forget that good kerning rules should also be applied to numbers.

FCPX kerning numbers

You will find the kerning control in the text inspector, but you’ll have to twiddle down the Advanced disclosure triangle to see it. Place the cursor in-between the letters and kern away until it looks good. Move on to the next spacing and repeat.

FCPX kerning GUI

9) Serif or not Serif?

Hang on a minute, what on earth is a serif?

A serif is a small extra line attached to a letter, indicated below by the red arrows on the image. They originated from the days when text was written with a brush. By varying the pressure and angle of the brush, these additions or flourishes to each character were added.

Serif fonts include Times, Courier and Copperplate which you should all find on a standard install of FCPX & OS X.

Fonts without serifs are called sans-serif and include the Helveticas, Arials and Lucida Grande for example.

With the current design trend for flat graphics, the contemporary thought for good design is to use san-serif fonts. Personally I think they are easier to read anyway and are my choice unless I’m looking for the old typography look of a book or newspaper.” – Peter Wiggins

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CoreMelt LUTx

Color Look Up Tables (LUTs) allow you to apply preset color grades by professional colorists easily on your own footage. CoreMelt LUTx is the most powerful LUT solution for Final Cut Pro X. Plus, get LUTx for free when you purchase the CoreMelt Everything Bundle.

The initial release comes with 40 Feature Film looks designed by feature film colorist Shane Bartley in our first LUT collection, with more coming soon. Unique features include the ability to create subtle looks by lowering the intensity of the LUT in shadows, midtones and highlights, custom intuitive sliders, realtime previews of LUTs in our LUT browser and realtime wipe preview.

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Masterclass || John de Borman – Composition & Framing

“John de Borman takes us through his method of composition and framing in films. Deconstructing the meaning behind the characters, scene or location and how to portray these elements in a concise and methodical way. We use examples from ‘An Education’, ‘Made in Dagenham’, ‘If I stay’, ‘Quartet’ and ‘The Full Monty’.” – Cooke Optics

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the Cooke Optics youtube channel you are missing out! You can be sure that its going to be one of the hottest new channels in the film industry!

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Customize Default Effects in Final Cut Pro X

“Apple’s recent Final Cut Pro X update includes a convenient new feature that allows users to easily assign default audio and video effects to their clips using a simple keyboard shortcut. Let’s take a look at how it works.

With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, Apple is certainly not attempting to reinvent the wheel. For the most part, the update includes bug fixes, performance enhancements, and other new features, such as the ability to output to multiple YouTube clips at once. But one of the more interesting additions to 10.2.3, one that will make certain editorial tasks easier and more convenient, is Final Cut Pro X’s ability to customize default effects.

Many of you are probably already familiar with Final Cut Pro X’s default transitions as a result of using the shortcutCMD+T. With a clip selected, this will automatically apply a cross dissolve, giving editors a very fluid method for applying a transition without using their mouse.” – Noam Kroll | PremiumBeat

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First Look at Red Giant PluralEyes 4

“How PluralEyes 4 Works

Synched media

Basically, PluralEyes 4 will automatically ingest, organize and sync your media files and export them to your NLE project synced and ready to edit. Using the specular audio data, PluralEyes will match up the raw video and audio clips from your production and sync them. Then you can chose to export directly to FCP X or Adobe Premiere Pro or save the video and audio files out to work with any NLE, such as Sony Vegas Pro.

Of course, all your video must have some kind of audio track to perform the sync, but in my tests, even GoPro footage was easily synced with both DSLR and EXCAM clips along with a mixed audio track in a 5-cam multicam production with ease.

The PluralEyes 4 Three-Step Sync Workflow

Red Giant really streamlined PluralEyes 4’s UI and workflow and ease of use, while providing greater performance of sync capabilities of multicam productions. Simpler single cam and audio recorder shoots such as multi-clip DSLR interviews with an audio recorder can all be synced quickly – often in just seconds.

The workflow is simple: Add Media, Synchronize, Export.

When you start PluralEyes 4, its main window appears. This simplified design takes you through the step-by-step process of importing media files, synchronizing them and exporting the synched clips. While there are three tabs across the top of the top of the window, only the Add Media tab is highlighted until your project has media imported to it and ready to start synchronizing. You simply drag-drop your media folders or files onto the window and PluralEyes 4 will begin ingesting and organizing the files into separate tracks, ready to sync.

Add Media Drag Drop arrow

You can continue adding more media folders and files to create additional tracks. PluralEyes 4 is ready to sync once all your media has been added. Simply click ont he Synchronize tab to start the sync process – no further file preparation or other settings are required. Red Giant has really made this simple and taken the guesswork out of this process.” – Jeff Foster | Pro Video Coalition

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Red Giant Shooter Suite 13 and PluralEyes 4 Now Available!

The Shooter Suite 13 update includes many new features in Red Giant PluralEyes, as well as integration between PluralEyes 4 and Offload.

Shooter Suite 13

Bring your footage from set to post with confidence

Red Giant Shooter Suite is a set of tools that gives you the freedom to shoot the way you want, with the confidence that your footage will make it from your camera to the editing timeline safe, sound and in sync.

What’s new:

This update includes many new features in Red Giant PluralEyes, as well as integration between PluralEyes 4 and Offload, and works with any non-linear editor.

Included in Shooter Suite 13:

  • PLURALEYES 4.0 – Audio/Video Sync in Seconds. No clapboards or timecode needed.
  • OFFLOAD 1.0 – Simple & reliable backup of your footage in the field.
  • INSTANT 4K – Upconvert video to 4K resolution and other high-resolution formats.
  • FRAMES 1.1 – Deinterlace your older footage and convert it to 24P.

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MSRP: MSRP: $399.00  TF Price: $379.05

PluralEyes

Fast, Accurate & Automatic
With a touch of a single button, PluralEyes analyzes the audio from your cameras and audio devices and syncs them up, in seconds. No clapboards or timecode are needed.

What’s new:

Simpler. Faster. Smarter. Better.
Syncing just got even easier. In previous versions of PluralEyes, there were over a dozen different sync combination possibilities (Try Really Hard, Change Clip Order…etc.), which meant you might have to run the sync several times before getting it right. In version 4.0, PluralEyes analyzes your footage and automatically uses the best possible options. Just hit the Sync button, and PluralEyes does the rest.

Premiere Pro Panel
Get all the power and simplicity of syncing in PluralEyes without ever having to leave Premiere Pro. Just hit the Sync button in Premiere Pro, and PluralEyes does all the work. PluralEyes will even color code your footage based on the results of the sync, so that you know which clips, if any, need your attention.

Smart Start
We’ve made importing media easier than ever. Drag and drop an entire folder of media into PluralEyes, and during a sync it will automatically detect which device the media came from. Your files will be sorted so that media from the same device are on the same track.

Automatic Drift Correction
In long clips, sound and video can stop matching up perfectly. Unlike any other sync tool in the industry, PluralEyes can account for that and export a perfect sync. New in version 4, if drift is detected, PluralEyes automatically fixes it, and gives you the option to toggle between the drift corrected sync and the original audio without correction applied.

Vertical Track Scaling
PluralEyes 4.0 adds the ability to scale tracks vertically so that you can see more detail in the waveform when inspecting your media.

Track Comparisons
Select which audio waveform is shown next to the video track, making it easier to verify that the clips have synced properly.

Offload Integration
Red Giant Offload performs a checksum during media transfer from your camera card to your hard drive, giving you the peace of mind that your footage was backed up with no loss. New in PluralEyes 4.0 is the ability to detect Offload events and bring the footage over to PluralEyes for a seamless workflow between Offload to PluralEyes to the host-app.

Keyboard Shortcuts
PluralEyes now has the same keyboard shortcuts as Premiere Pro for a more intuitive, familiar timeline and playback experience.

Color Coding
Export from PluralEyes to Premiere Pro now features a color coding option for clips that don’t sync properly. This is also part of the Premiere Pro panel experience, but also happens if you sync in PluralEyes and export to Premiere Pro.

Learn More | Purchase PluralEyes 4

MSRP: $299.00  TF Price: $284.05

8 Essential Cuts Every Editor Should Know

“If your goal is to master the art of editing, you’re going to need to know the essential cuts to use when editing a film or video. Let’s go through eight of these and look at some examples of each. For said examples, we’ll be using excerpts from various films — but keep in mind that you can use these same cuts in any editing session, be it narrative, documentary, commercial, industrial, or even animation.

1. The Standard

The hard cut is the basic type of cut in editing. This type of cut is utilized when you want to cut from clip to clip without any type of transition, or where you cut from the end of one clip to the beginning of another. The only down side of the hard cut is that (out of all the cuts we’ll talk about) this one gives the least amount of visual meaning. To give you a quick overview of the history of cutting, here is a great video from Filmmaker IQ.

2. Jump Cut

The jump cut is a technique which allows the editor to jump forward in time. We see an early version of this technique in Eisenstein‘s Battleship Potemkin, where the battleship fires a mortar round and we watch the destruction as various angles jump cut from one to another. In this very early version of the jump cut, contemporary audiences were introduced to a new way of time passage in film. It obviously gained traction and is one of the most used types of cuts today next to the hard cut.” – Johnathan Paul | Premium Beat

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