FCPX Workflow: One Smart Collection To Rule Them All

“The first key to workflow wizardry is to exploit an application’s strengths. In exploring the nuances of FCPX, famed workflow wizard Simon Ubsdell opens up some of the secrets around one of its most uniquely powerful, but sorely underused tools: Smart Collections. This isn’t about replacing your existing project management (although it can). It’s about leveraging some of the ridiculously awesome power of the Smart Collection to make your work flow far more easily than you might have imagined.

Another aspect of Simon’s wizardry: this is something he quickly whipped together springing out of two very energetic conversations in Creative COW’s FCPX or Not: The Debate forum. The first is based on Charlie Austin’s presentation for FCPWORKS’ FCP Exchange, called Making the Switch to X: A Comparative Study. As the conversation evolved, Simon more deeply explored the specific question, what might happen if you used one Library, one Event, one Smart Collection to organize everything? He continued to explore this on the new thread from whence this tutorial emerges, One Smart Collection to Rule Them All’>One Smart Collection to Rule Them All.

Take a look at this, then take a look at those, and prepare for your workflow to be transformed. Not unlike magic.” – Simon Ubsdell | Creative Cow

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Slow Down the Action With Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X

“It’s easy to slow down time using Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. Master the technique with FREE stock footage and music from Shutterstock and PremiumBeat.

One of our favorite video editing tools is Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X. This feature, similar to the popular Twixtor plugin, allows users to slow down clips in a way that simulates footage shot at a high frame rate.

Optical Flow is a great creative tool for showcasing your film and video projects in a unique way. The following video tutorial will demonstrate how to use creatively use Optical Flow in Final Cut Pro X.

But don’t just watch the clip… fire up Final Cut Pro X and discover what it’s like to manipulate time with Optical Flow! We’ve teamed up with Shutterstock to give you free assets so you can follow along.” – PremiumBeat

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Building 3D Robots with Motion Plug-ins for Final Cut Pro X

“It started off as a simple little experiment, and it turned out so good I decided to take it a little more seriously and actually make a package out of this :).

First little masterpiece that I’ll be releasing and it will be a package of robots with tons of controls, pre-rendered animations for quick use, LITE proxy versions to animate with then switch/replace with the hi-res and render, sound effects from my library (internally made..) and I’m not sure what else yet but I should be done the package within a week or so tops.

For now I really wanted to put this out for feedback, does it suck? Is it too much? I should be making around 5 robots, should I make more/less?

Cool preview video where I interact with the robots and I timelapsed the actual robot build so turned out pretty awesome so far for my skillsets :).” – FCP.CO

Click Here to Learn More | View Plugins for FCPX

Become a Master of Blending Modes in FCPX

“Add quick stylization to your video projects with blending modes in Final Cut Pro X. Learn the technique with FREE stock footage and music from Shutterstock and PremiumBeat.

Using a video element with a blending mode is one of the fastest ways to add a custom look to your project. If you’re not already familiar with the term, a blending mode tells Final Cut Pro how to interpret the colors and luminance of a video layer. For example, the screen blending mode will completely remove black pixels in your video.

There are dozens of different blending modes in Final Cut Pro X that can affect your footage in different ways. Let’s check out a few of our favorites in a new tutorial.” – PremiumBeat

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Need plug-ins for your next Final Cut Pro X Project? Try Here

The Top Ten Tips for Good Looking Typography in Final Cut Pro X

“Yes, the 3D text in Final Cut Pro X is amazing, but it is not a one-click solution to getting good looking text. We take a look at ten tips that should help to make your words on screen look good and avoid some common mistakes.

 

There is no doubt that good typography is hard. That’s why there are graphic designers who do nothing but concentrate on the design and layout of text.

The days of molten metal and Linotype machines are long gone, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t apply some old basic rules and guides to laying out text, this time in an NLE.

So here’s my top ten tips for making good looking, readable text in Final Cut Pro X. The examples are shown with the FCPX GUI, but the most of the techniques apply to all editing systems with a character generator.

10) Kerning

My pet hate is bad kerning and yes I shout at the television when I see text with incorrect spacing. It is also one of those things where once you have been made aware of it, you will see it everywhere.

Kerning is the adjustment of spacing between individual characters – not to be confused with tracking which adjusts the spacing between all characters at the same time.

Well kerned text should have the same surface area between each pair of letters or indeed numbers. Some fonts auto-kern, but still need a tweak to get looking right.

Take the name David for example as this is quite common in credits and shows the problem up well. The top name in the example below shows the text uncorrected. The second David highlights the different spacing between characters.

The third, kerned David shows an easier to read version where the character positions have been adjusted correctly. You can see there has been a lot of movement between the A and V, with not as much between the V and I.

FCPX kerning

Don’t forget that good kerning rules should also be applied to numbers.

FCPX kerning numbers

You will find the kerning control in the text inspector, but you’ll have to twiddle down the Advanced disclosure triangle to see it. Place the cursor in-between the letters and kern away until it looks good. Move on to the next spacing and repeat.

FCPX kerning GUI

9) Serif or not Serif?

Hang on a minute, what on earth is a serif?

A serif is a small extra line attached to a letter, indicated below by the red arrows on the image. They originated from the days when text was written with a brush. By varying the pressure and angle of the brush, these additions or flourishes to each character were added.

Serif fonts include Times, Courier and Copperplate which you should all find on a standard install of FCPX & OS X.

Fonts without serifs are called sans-serif and include the Helveticas, Arials and Lucida Grande for example.

With the current design trend for flat graphics, the contemporary thought for good design is to use san-serif fonts. Personally I think they are easier to read anyway and are my choice unless I’m looking for the old typography look of a book or newspaper.” – Peter Wiggins

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Masterclass || John de Borman – Composition & Framing

“John de Borman takes us through his method of composition and framing in films. Deconstructing the meaning behind the characters, scene or location and how to portray these elements in a concise and methodical way. We use examples from ‘An Education’, ‘Made in Dagenham’, ‘If I stay’, ‘Quartet’ and ‘The Full Monty’.” – Cooke Optics

If you haven’t had a chance to check out the Cooke Optics youtube channel you are missing out! You can be sure that its going to be one of the hottest new channels in the film industry!

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View Products for Final Cut Pro

Cuts and Transitions 101 – No Film School

“Glossary of Cuts

  • Cutting on action (cutting while there is movement on-screen)
  • Cutaway (cutting to an insert shot and then back)
  • Cross-cutting (back and forth between locations, ex: phone call)
  • Jump cuts (disjointed edits in the same shot or action)
  • Match cut (cut from one shot to a similar shot by either matching the action or composition)

Glossary of Transitions

  • Fade in/out (to/from black)
  • Dissolve (blend shots)
  • Smash cut (abrupt transition)
  • Iris (old-fashioned; circle that opens and closes in camera)
  • Wipes (screen wipes from one side to the other)
  • Invisible cuts (impression of a single take)
  • L-cut (audio transition)
  • J-cut (audio of the next scene starts before you get to it)” – Emily Buder | No Film School

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Customize Default Effects in Final Cut Pro X

“Apple’s recent Final Cut Pro X update includes a convenient new feature that allows users to easily assign default audio and video effects to their clips using a simple keyboard shortcut. Let’s take a look at how it works.

With the latest version of Final Cut Pro X, Apple is certainly not attempting to reinvent the wheel. For the most part, the update includes bug fixes, performance enhancements, and other new features, such as the ability to output to multiple YouTube clips at once. But one of the more interesting additions to 10.2.3, one that will make certain editorial tasks easier and more convenient, is Final Cut Pro X’s ability to customize default effects.

Many of you are probably already familiar with Final Cut Pro X’s default transitions as a result of using the shortcutCMD+T. With a clip selected, this will automatically apply a cross dissolve, giving editors a very fluid method for applying a transition without using their mouse.” – Noam Kroll | PremiumBeat

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