Final Cut Pro X – Reflecting on Six Years

Final Cut Pro X – Reflecting on Six Years

Oliver Peters has some personal musings about the last 6 years in the life of Final Cut Pro X.  Here’s an excerpt:

These six years have been a bit of a personal journey with Final Cut Pro X after a number of years with the “classic” version. I’ve been using FCPX since it first came out on commercials, corporate videos, shorts and even an independent feature film. It’s not my primary NLE most of the time, because my clients have largely moved to Adobe Premiere Pro CC and ask me to be compatible with them. My FCPX work tends to be mixed in and around my Premiere Pro editing gigs…

…I have to say that even after six years, Final Cut Pro X is still more of a crapshoot than any other editing tool that I’ve used. I love its organizing power and often start a job really liking it. However, the deeper I get into the job – and the larger the library becomes – and the more complex the sequences become – the more bogged down FCPX becomes. It’s also the most inconsistent across various Mac models. I’ve run it on older towers, new MacBook Pros, iMacs and 2013 Mac Pros. Of these experiences, the laptops seem to be the most optimized for FCPX.

Read Oliver Peters’ full article at DigitalFilms here.

Webinar: Apple Final Cut Pro X: Simple Tricks & Pithy Tips

Webinar: Apple Final Cut Pro X: Simple Tricks & Pithy Tips

Wednesday February 22, 2017

larry jordan power up seriesLarry Jordan Powerup Series

Apple Final Cut Pro X: Simple Tricks & Pithy Tips

It is easy to get caught up in all the amazing technology contained inside Final Cut Pro X. But, sometimes, it’s worth taking a step back to look at how to accomplish those simple tasks that we know are there – somewhere – if only we knew where to look.

That’s what this session is about. Simple tricks and pithy tips that can help you edit faster, and add some fun to your life. Areas we will look at include:

  • The interface
  • Importing
  • Editing and Trimming
  • Organizing and Replacing clips
  • Keyboard shortcuts
  • Audio tricks
  • Transitions
  • Fixing audio problems
  • Simple color correction
  • Titles
  • Exporting

Plus lots more as we get closer to the session. Registration is always free – sign up today.

AUDIENCE LEVEL

This is an intermediate session for Final Cut Pro X  editors, some experience with the software will help understand what is being covered. All you need to view this session is a web browser.

Time: 9:00 AM & 12:00 PM (PST)
Register Here: LarryJordan.com

 

Learn about more free webinars at Toolfarm.com

Become a Master of Blending Modes in FCPX

“Add quick stylization to your video projects with blending modes in Final Cut Pro X. Learn the technique with FREE stock footage and music from Shutterstock and PremiumBeat.

Using a video element with a blending mode is one of the fastest ways to add a custom look to your project. If you’re not already familiar with the term, a blending mode tells Final Cut Pro how to interpret the colors and luminance of a video layer. For example, the screen blending mode will completely remove black pixels in your video.

There are dozens of different blending modes in Final Cut Pro X that can affect your footage in different ways. Let’s check out a few of our favorites in a new tutorial.” – PremiumBeat

Click Here to Watch the Video and Learn More

Need plug-ins for your next Final Cut Pro X Project? Try Here

How the Hollywood film Whiskey Tango Foxtrot was edited on Final Cut Pro X

“Whiskey Tango Foxtrot is the new comedy war film from Paramount Studios starring Tina Fey. We asked director Glenn Ficarra, Editor Jan Kovac, Assistant Editor Kevin Bailey and Apprentice Editor Esther Sokolow how the film was made, what was different from Focus and of course how well Final Cut Pro X performed?

We think you know the answer already, but again their detailed workflow is well worth a read. Especially if you are going to cut your next Hollywood feature film on Final Cut Pro X!

Last year’s FCP.co’s two articles on Focus, the first major Hollywood studio film to be cut on FCPX, proved to be highly popular. So when we were asked if we would like to find out more about Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, the latest Tina Fey film from directors Glenn Ficarra and John Requa, we jumped at the chance. ” – fcp.co

Click Here to read the full article

5 Essential Final Cut Pro Audio Editing Tutorials

Check out five essential Final Cut Pro audio editing tutorials that will help you increase your turnaround time!

Mixing and mastering audio is a challenge for a lot of professional videographers and filmmakers. But that doesn’t have to be the case, thanks to this handy roundup of essential Final Cut Pro audio editing tutorials.

1. Audio Basics in Final Cut Pro

Created By: Larry Jordan

In this clip, Larry Jordan takes us through the workflow of editing a project in Final Cut Pro X. He hits incredibly important topics such as audio techniques, settings, effects and working with music. This is really just a back-to-basics tutorial, which any professional needs every now and again.

2. Managing Audio Levels and Edits

Created By: Benjamin Halsall

This tutorial from professional video editor Ben Halsall goes over some essential tips for audio management in Final Cut Pro X. He goes over audio levels, mixing production music, and how to edit audio for techniques such as L cuts.

Click Here to View the Rest

329 Free Action Elements for Video Editors

“Looking for free action elements for your video projects? Want HUNDREDS of free action elements? Well, you’re going to love this.

Whether you’re a video editor, VFX artist, or compositor, chances are you probably use elements on a regular basis. This is especially true if you are working on an action film. However, if you’ve done your research, you know that good action elements can be really expensive.” – Caleb Ward | Premium Beat

Click Here to Learn More and View Library!

The Video Editor’s Guide to Color Grading

Increasingly, color grading is being handled by video editors working on laptops and desktops instead of calibrated displays. Here are some ways to make this reality work for you.

“Professional color grading applications have plummeted in price from six figures to zero. Meanwhile, accurate, grade-quality monitors have continued to remain expensive and out of reach. This bifurcation of technology has created a whole generation of people doing color work on video without the ability to evaluate the results on a properly calibrated display.

First off, a caveat: it is a much better experience to color grade in an environment suited for accuracy with a color-calibrated display. The problem with color is that it is so hard to do right, and so easy to really screw up.

If your pipeline includes finishing in a color suite with a skilled colorist, then stop reading now. If, however, you are part of the vast majority of people doing color work for video who are precisely NOT colorists, then this article will have some helpful tips to get you through to the finish line.

Increasingly, color correction and grading is being handled by editors on portables and desktops, creating content that will live on mobile phones and in someone’s Facebook feed. For most content, color doesn’t need to be perfect — it just has to be in the ballpark.” – Eric Escobar | Premium Beat

Click Here to Learn More

8 Essential Cuts Every Editor Should Know

“If your goal is to master the art of editing, you’re going to need to know the essential cuts to use when editing a film or video. Let’s go through eight of these and look at some examples of each. For said examples, we’ll be using excerpts from various films — but keep in mind that you can use these same cuts in any editing session, be it narrative, documentary, commercial, industrial, or even animation.

1. The Standard

The hard cut is the basic type of cut in editing. This type of cut is utilized when you want to cut from clip to clip without any type of transition, or where you cut from the end of one clip to the beginning of another. The only down side of the hard cut is that (out of all the cuts we’ll talk about) this one gives the least amount of visual meaning. To give you a quick overview of the history of cutting, here is a great video from Filmmaker IQ.

2. Jump Cut

The jump cut is a technique which allows the editor to jump forward in time. We see an early version of this technique in Eisenstein‘s Battleship Potemkin, where the battleship fires a mortar round and we watch the destruction as various angles jump cut from one to another. In this very early version of the jump cut, contemporary audiences were introduced to a new way of time passage in film. It obviously gained traction and is one of the most used types of cuts today next to the hard cut.” – Johnathan Paul | Premium Beat

Click Here to View the Rest

5 THINGS TO TRY IN YOUR EDITING APP

“Today’s video editing applications like Adobe Premiere, Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer and Sony Vegas are affordable, accessible and incredibly powerful tools for video postproduction. Video editing programs like these let you do way more than just edit video clips together. They allow you to turn ordinary edits into polished, professional video productions.  These 5 tips will help you UP your editing power.” – Videomaker.com

Click Here to View