8 Essential Cuts Every Editor Should Know

“If your goal is to master the art of editing, you’re going to need to know the essential cuts to use when editing a film or video. Let’s go through eight of these and look at some examples of each. For said examples, we’ll be using excerpts from various films — but keep in mind that you can use these same cuts in any editing session, be it narrative, documentary, commercial, industrial, or even animation.

1. The Standard

The hard cut is the basic type of cut in editing. This type of cut is utilized when you want to cut from clip to clip without any type of transition, or where you cut from the end of one clip to the beginning of another. The only down side of the hard cut is that (out of all the cuts we’ll talk about) this one gives the least amount of visual meaning. To give you a quick overview of the history of cutting, here is a great video from Filmmaker IQ.

2. Jump Cut

The jump cut is a technique which allows the editor to jump forward in time. We see an early version of this technique in Eisenstein‘s Battleship Potemkin, where the battleship fires a mortar round and we watch the destruction as various angles jump cut from one to another. In this very early version of the jump cut, contemporary audiences were introduced to a new way of time passage in film. It obviously gained traction and is one of the most used types of cuts today next to the hard cut.” – Johnathan Paul | Premium Beat

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5 THINGS TO TRY IN YOUR EDITING APP

“Today’s video editing applications like Adobe Premiere, Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer and Sony Vegas are affordable, accessible and incredibly powerful tools for video postproduction. Video editing programs like these let you do way more than just edit video clips together. They allow you to turn ordinary edits into polished, professional video productions.  These 5 tips will help you UP your editing power.” – Videomaker.com

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10 Video Editing Habits to Give Up – Videomaker.com

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It’s easy to get into a routine when video editing and as a result form some habits, and not necessarily good ones. Video editing is an art form with rules, or more realistically guidelines, that help define the difference between what’s good and what’s bad. Even though what is considered good or bad for video editing is subjective and somewhat arbitrary, there are some basic principles that can be followed to help make a video successful. When bad habits break the rules there’s trouble to be found. Here are 10 video editing habits to give up as the New Year rolls around.

1. Winging It

A lot of creative people like to wing it, take things serendipitously and let a project unfold as they work on it. This is a habit that’s easy to fall into as a video editor, footage shows up and the editor sorts it out as they go. The danger lies in the fact that a project may consume more time than necessary when a video editor is winging it, and they run the risk of missing the point. Instead of shooting from the hip, be prepared and make a plan. Learning to have a few contingency plans that can apply to multiple projects will a make a video editor more productive and help them to stay on task.

2. Scaling It Up

The excitement of a new project is exhilarating and it’s easy to jump right into the mayhem of video editing. This is the problematic habit of starting before the project’s ready. To avoid it, know what the goal of the project is and most importantly, know the deliverables. Ask, “How is this project going to be delivered? How long should it be? At what resolution and format does it need to be?” A project that runs too long and is in the wrong format presents a world of problems that are avoidable with some simple knowledge up front.

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